Politics

Recruiting & Retaining: Are The Best And Brightest Attracted To Public Service?

When thinking of government service in Pakistan, a few things tend to pop into a person’s head. A sharply dressed officer with a prominent power walk, a shiny official car, a personal secretary carrying files and folders. “What’s not to like?, one tends to think. But, is the public sector and its practices in Pakistan… Continue reading Recruiting & Retaining: Are The Best And Brightest Attracted To Public Service?

Politics · Social · Thoughts

The Myth of Peaceful Resistance (#Mandela)

There is a way in which the myth of peaceful resistance is flattering to the oppressor and disabling to the oppressed. It’s as much the oppressor’s narrative as anyone’s. “You ought not to fight us with more than the image of your own broken body,” it says, “for we who oppress you are good and rational — most of the time. We have the same interests as you, and understand that you enjoy the same basic rights. We, your rulers, simply need to have our consciences pricked from time to time.” By couching the antipathy as a mere moral lapse, the oppressor is permitted simultaneously to deny the actual material basis of the social division and hence the necessity for a struggle for liberation that is more than merely symbolic, and to perform a mental splitting-off from its own identity of those aspects of itself it can now pretend were inessential deviations from its rational, humanistic core. Just as the United States broadly did with the benighted South of Bull Connor and the Klan. As if the story of American racist oppression was one of mere regional ideological peccadillo and not one of the founding principles of the whole nation’s economic structure. As if the story of Apartheid were simply those nasty Afrikaners and their gauche racism. They’d probably lived in Africa too long and allowed its “tribalism” to rub off on them, and so deviated from the European universalist norm. Still, one of us in the end, eh? – Three Fingered Fox

 

Politics · Social · Thoughts

Using sports to make peace, with Dr. Sarah Kureshi

We’ve all heard plenty about the United States when it comes to matters concerning Pakistan. Drone strikes, political restrictions and policy influencing. A day doesn’t go by that we don’t blame the United States for the state our country is in. A few months ago, however, I got a chance to meet a helping hand from the States,… Continue reading Using sports to make peace, with Dr. Sarah Kureshi

Politics · Social · Thoughts

What Pakistan can learn from Glee’s Most Controversial Episode

A few days ago, I was reading through my HuffPost Android app, and I came across an article about  Glee, a TV show that I had followed through the first two seasons, and maintain a healthy interest in. The article by Jaimie Etkin discussed how actress Lauren Potter [plays character Becky Jackson] felt after filming Episode 18 of Season 4 – where… Continue reading What Pakistan can learn from Glee’s Most Controversial Episode

Politics · Social · Thoughts

An Interview with Urban Pakistanis about the Elections 2013

With election fever in the air, and belly-fulls of strong opinions being hurled every which way, I thought it would be nice to ask around, and see what people thought about the elections, about Imran Khan (the most talked about man of the year) and create sort of a collage of all that went on… Continue reading An Interview with Urban Pakistanis about the Elections 2013

Books · Celebs · Contemporary · Fiction · Politics · Religion · Social

The Islamabad Literature Festival

The Islamabad Literature Festival, hashtagged on Twitter as #IsbLF, is the latest in a series of literary events taking the country by storm. I had the opportunity, this Labor Day, of driving over to Margalla Hotel, and attending a series of enlightening talks. Having recently attended the Lahore Literature Festival (#LLF), I had high expectations.… Continue reading The Islamabad Literature Festival

Books · Contemporary · Fiction · Politics · Religion · Social · Thoughts

The Wandering Falcon/Pakistani novelists

  I love novels, biographies, fiction, non-fiction, history, politics – everything. It is rare that I am not carrying around my latest read wherever I go. Unfortunately, despite many positive reviews and glowing praise from friends and teachers, I’ve never been fond of literature written by Pakistani authors. I often find it stereotypical – talk… Continue reading The Wandering Falcon/Pakistani novelists

Politics · Social · Thoughts

I Met The Government & It Disappointed Me

On June 26th, my family and I attended a National Assembly session. Yupp, you heard me. We were in these jury-box type seating areas that ran along the wall of the circular room that houses several desks (with attached bendy mics that turn red when they’re switched on), a large podium-desk item where the guy… Continue reading I Met The Government & It Disappointed Me

Books · Contemporary · Fiction · Politics · Religion · Social · Thoughts

Watching TV in Bombay, or Kingston, or Dhaka

Zadie Smith‘s first novel blew me away, but where exactly? The book starts of with an attempted suicide – definitely gripping. Throughout the book, Smith uses words to her advantage. No skimping, no summarizing. No sir, she uses simple, direct words in abundance. The result of which is clear, sharp mental pictures. Even the characters are embellished… Continue reading Watching TV in Bombay, or Kingston, or Dhaka

Politics · Religion · Social · Thoughts · University

Why I Don’t Think My Education Is Turning Me Into A Mindless Slave Monkey

Hi. You like complaining about your university, and about your country, and your government (they do everything wrong, don’t they?), and hey – even about that teacher that ACTUALLY makes you work hard. I mean, turning in an assignment on time WITHOUT getting the deadline extended? HOLY MOLY! She’s such a tyrannical maniac, asking you… Continue reading Why I Don’t Think My Education Is Turning Me Into A Mindless Slave Monkey